Thoughts about riding in an ambulance

I recently broke my leg. Housebound and bored, I’m blogging my way to a clear mind. Read all posts about breaking a leg.

As soon as I fell someone called an ambulance. I wasn’t sure why (an ambulance is for sick people, not for a simple fall…) but during the 50 minute wait I realised that I would actually be going in an ambulance for the first time. This seemed kinda cool as I’ve always wanted to look inside an ambulance, and considering I was in a lot of pain the thought of a new experience was the only silver lining coming to mind.

Needless to say being in an ambulance was not as interesting as I had imagined. I guess it never is unless you’re lucky enough to poke around because your friend is a paramedic and not because you or a relation are in pain and on the way to hospital. I was lying down the entire time which also limits your ability to look around.

Almost immediately the paramedics said I had broken something. I guess the 45 degree angle my foot was rocking was a clue so they said I must be in a lot of pain and would I like some gas and air? The thought of gas and air sounded awesome – it makes you happy and giddy right?!

Apparently it works amazingly for some and doesn’t work for others. Despite inhaling deeply during my ride through London it didn’t help at all which was a shame. It would have been nice to have been light headed and calm whilst I waited for my foot to be reset!

All silly thoughts about ambulances and gas and air aside, the paramedics were amazing. I’d like to think I was a pretty good patient, all British politeness and bad jokes, and they made me feel really safe and secure after 50 minutes shivering outside in the cold worrying.

It wasn’t until I was in the ambulance that I began to realise that whatever this was it wasn’t going to go away today. As the engine started I remember the paramedic talking about holidays. I told him I had just booked flights to America, a trip of a lifetime, to see a friend who had moved there and… and oh my gawd it’s just hit me would I still be able to go?

Turns out the answer is no. I now need to stump up a few hundred pounds to change my flight because I can’t get a refund on the original flight. After months of saving it made me want to cry more than a little inside, but now I’m just grateful that my experience inside an ambulance was boring and peppered with the luxury of talk about a holiday, rather than having to endure the full ambulance experience that paramedics administer to save lives every day.

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